Got 10 minutes to learn about the history of the drum kit as we know it today? We talk about how individual drums, players, and genres helped the kit evolve.

There is no rule saying that “the producer gets this percentage and the artist gets this percentage.” All of this is negotiable. What is important is that all creators understand and take advantage of what publishing rights have to offer. This involves having a conversation with your collaborators about the publishing percentage owned, and properly registering your share with a collection service like Songtrust. Alternatively, you could be the sole creator and automatically own and register at 100%.

The fun part of this feature is that it allows you to do a little experimenting, and the real-time data analytics will help you formulate hypotheses and conclusions based on your results.

Photography grants 2019

Taking more than a little inspiration from the 1970s bestseller Zen & The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, this might be the best all-around volume written on audio engineering we’ve seen yet. Mixerman’s gift is his ability to meld his personal experience in recording and mixing with useful practical advice and thought-provoking philosophical musings. He moves easily from the big picture to the small details (and then back again) meaning that this book is just as useful for a relatively experienced reader as it is for a beginner. It’s really got something for everyone.

Because I’m personally so influenced by Nick Cave and Leonard Cohen, I’ve spent a lot of time reading poets like Sappho, Auden, Berryman, and T.S. Eliot, and listening to Jewish and Christian liturgical music, which were all major influences on them. Cohen’s “Suzanne” oozes with classical, religiously steeped references.

A classic example is the LCD Soundsystem song “All My Friends.” The song develops extensively, without an obvious lyrical structure. There are certainly repeated melodies, various layers coming and going, and a strong lyrical narrative, but it never deviates from that repetitive piano part.

This would also be a good place to bring up that some music theory people don’t consider two-note intervals “chords.” But my take on that whole controversy is that, when naming things, it should be taken into account how our brains ascertain tonal information based on everything we’ve heard before, in all of music. It’s just something our brains do, so why deny it because we selfishly want a more tidy nomenclature?

Brown thus had to finance the album himself to get it made, which today isn’t so rare but during the time this was virtually unheard of. James Brown knew that a live album was the best way to showcase his music, and his incredible band, to the world after seeing the success of Ray Charles’s 1960 live record, In Person. It may have seemed like a risky move, but Brown was completely confident in his band and his ability to move an audience. It’s just that… well, Brown had to make very clear to his band that he would triple any fines they got that night for messing up. You know, normal band stuff.

Call for curators

The presence of the G# in the Harmonic Minor scale changes the names of the modes, because they now contain a different tone. For example, D Dorian has now become D Dorian (Augmented fourth): This mode differs from D Dorian by one note, the G#, which is an augmented fourth away from the Tonic, hence its name D Dorian (Augmented fourth). In the same scale, the mode constructed on E has now become E Phrygian (Major third). Since a Phrygian mode is by definition a minor mode, some people prefer to call it Mixolydian (Minor second, Minor sixth).

This album was also one of the only albums to be played start to finish by radio DJs at the time. They were encouraged by the indisputable hoards of screaming fans audible in the Apollo theatre audience. Bobby Byrd, one of the Famous Flames, said, “People were calling in, they really wanted to hear the whole thing, the excitement and everything.” The album catapulted James Brown from the chitlin circuit to the main stage.

Whether you are a seasoned songwriter or you have just recently begun to write your own music, an important part of songwriting involves being self aware. Knowing what makes you tick will spur your creativity in new and unexpected ways. What kind of music do you enjoy listening to? How does your taste in music reflect the style of songs that you want to craft? How do certain grooves and tonalities make you feel? Which events and stories from your own life or the lives of others around you inspire you? These are all questions for self reflection while trying to write music.

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional support and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! That means you’re not just getting the course content, but a coach to bounce ideas off of and someone invested in your success. Check out our courses such as Songwriting for Producers, The Art of Hip-Hop Production, and Modern Pop Vocal Production, and preview any or all for free!

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