Capital grants for nonprofits

Canada council curatorial grants

Something like a well-placed delay or reverb can add unbelievable character to a percussion part. Since your kicks, snares, toms, and hi-hats are each isolated, you have the power to add effects your entire kit as well as individual instruments. Depending on the character of the track you’re building, these effects allow you to construct drum parts that are clear and driving, or ambient and unpredictable.

The most important thing to bear in mind is that when you’re working with a mix, you’re dealing with a multitude of complex and interconnected phase relationships. EQ that kick drum and you are changing its phase relationship to other sounds appearing in the mix. Hopefully it’s not audible (or at least still sounds good), but it is there.

“My family, we’re all musicians, we’re all artists, and my brother and sister, they usually make money by juggling at the stoplights or busking in Old San Juan,” she says. “And if there’s no stoplights left because they were all torn down in the hurricane, that means they don’t have their usual spot, and in Old San Juan, it’s not like any tourists are going to come to a disaster island. That is not something that we can count on.”

Grants for band instruments

The sign of a thriving music city is one that the residents are excited to be a part of it. This is the case with Asheville — musicians and fans there not only feel excited and lucky to call Asheville their home, but they are genuinely thriving there

Instructed by composer and producer Martin D. Fowler (This American Life, Limetown, etc.), this course is an all-encompassing boot camp in one of the most widely used and most multi-functional DAWs out there: Logic Pro X. It’s used by pro-level producers, songwriters, engineers, and composers of all types to achieve the sound they’re searching for. Logic is also extremely affordable as far as DAWs go, making it perfect for the home-recording musician.

Seriously — it’s so easy to think you know a song perfectly, but then suddenly you have to play it with headphones on and an annoying click in your ear and the whole thing falls apart. When you’re practicing, try to replicate the environment you’ll encounter at your recording studio as much as possible. It’ll help worlds when you actually get in there.

Let’s face it: the music industry’s obsession with audiophile culture benefits big business more than anyone. 100 years ago, people’s minds would have been blown by a scratchy recording mechanically amplified through a gramophone. Today, we’ve been erroneously convinced that we need the best-of-the-best tech in order to truly connect with that music. At the end of the day, it’s just more money in the pockets of the 1%.

Explore Soundfly’s wide array of free online courses and expand your musical skills over your lunch break! Here’s just a few free courses you can choose from: How to Create a Killer Musician Website, Theory for Bedroom Producers, Touring on a Shoestring, and How to Get All the Royalties You Never Knew Existed. Or check out our 4-week coaching program, The Headliners Club, and work with one of our professional Soundfly Mentors to reach your musical goals! 

Scholarships for college sophomores

Solution: Keep a practice journal and set weekly goals. Budget your practice time in your journal the way you would your finances. Break goals into small chunks and keep a record of how you actually end up spending that time. Make adjustments regularly and cut yourself some slack. Ten minutes of focused practice can be more helpful than two hours of tedious drills, particularly if your mind is elsewhere. Instead of panicking over minutes and hours, focus on what you can achieve in the time you have available.

You can see why turntablists like scratching “ahhhh” and “fressssshhhh” so much — they’re structureless slabs of tuned white noise, so they’re more forgiving. Scratching a rap a cappella is another story. The words have meanings, and the pitches have a musical context. When a word falls in the wrong spot or with the wrong emphasis, it sounds much worse than a wrong note in a jazz solo, and an untrained listener is more likely to notice it.

One such example is here in “Let’s Go,” where bassist Benjamin Orr does a double chromatic run in the interlude at the end of the chorus and leading into the “She’s laughing inside” verse. It’s a simple, basic riff, starting at the major third, walking up three notes to the fifth, and continuing with another four-note chromatic run up to the octave. It comes at an opportune moment, building up the suspense leading into the last set of verses, in an already high-tempo, high-energy song.

“My experience with Soundfly was beyond expectations. When I enrolled the class I didn’t know how great the class would be designed and how personalized it would be! I really appreciated to have a mentor, I felt supported and pushed to reach my goals. Sırma is incredible! Every time I received an e-mail from her I was excited to read her feedback!”

We’ll keep it in the family again with the second release in Ashikawa’s “Wave Notation” series, his own album, Still Way. This record actually features Midori Takada on harp and vibraphone. Ashikawa only released three records in this series before he died; the third was a full LP of pensive Erik Satie pieces played on solo piano by Satsuki Shibano.