Hildur Guðnadóttir’s name might sound familiar to you of late as a result of her incredibly powerful score to HBO’s series Chernobyl, as well as her name being dropped recently as the composer who will score Todd Phillips’ upcoming blockbuster Joker, starring Joaquin Phoenix. But she’s more than just a film composer. She’s also a cellist, singer, electronic producer, and proponent of a strange digital variant on the cello called Ómar — a six-string electric cello built with computerized signal processing hardware that simulates the sonic properties of an acoustic cello, but with infinite flexibility and zero feedback. But back to her composing. She’s written and recorded several film and television series scores, and performed solo cello on countless others like The Revenant, Arrival, and both Sicario films, and has also arranged for choirs and contributed to recorded works for bands like Sunn O))), Múm, The Knife, Skúli Sverrisson, Nico Muhly, Hauschka, and Jóhann Jóhannsson. For sure, we’ll be hearing more from her for years!

This song is a great example of how music theory and psychology can help the songwriting process. In essence, you want to try to structure how listeners bring their sense of joy through the song, with the ultimate high point being in the chorus where lyrics and melodies are all repeated for better recall. Now you’ve got a tonal hierarchy to work with to make that section, and the others leading up to it, even stronger.

All of our mentored courses come with six weeks of one-on-one professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Whether you’re interested to dive deep into a topic covered by one of our in-depth courses like Songwriting For Producers, Modern Mix Techniques, Sight Singing and Harmony Essentials or The Creative Power of Advanced Harmony, or just to work with a Soundfly Mentor directly to achieve a specific goal, we can help you succeed. 

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Some musicians don’t take their work seriously while others get themselves into big trouble by working too hard and taking on too much. Believing in your music and working hard is essential, but going into major debt over your music or spending month after month on the road away from home leaves you at risk of burning out, which can be hard to recover from.

But such a dismissal would be disrespectful to the medium, and there are plenty of legit reasons to pay tribute to a beloved song by producing a chiptune cover.

For most of the music I play, power chords usually do the trick. I make use of them almost exclusively when writing rhythm parts or exploring chord progression ideas because they’re simple, communicative, and easy to arrange around. Sometimes, though, you’ll want something that sounds a bit fuller and more epic.

+ Work 1:1 with a Soundfly Mentor with the Headliner’s Club, our month-long personalized learning program, and develop a plan to achieve your goals with the help of a professional musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran! What would you like to improve?

Then, you look at your profits. Any revenue from royalties, playing gigs, selling CDs, etc. To help you out, here is a sample Profit and Loss form. Feel free to edit it as needed or create your own!

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Get something loud that can take a beating. Beyond that, punk amps should be able to handle a sound somewhere between classic rock and metal. The amp will live and die by how it produces overdrive, but you’ll need a more rounded sound that doesn’t have as much high end as well. If you buy something with multiple smaller speakers, you’ll be able to keep your high end definition without cranking the EQ to compensate.

Let’s kick things off with a banger! Bernard Herrmann is a film scoring legend. Psycho, Vertigo, Citizen Kane, you name it, he’s probably written it. One of his earliest films, The Day the Earth Stood Still, directed by Robert Wise, was also the first time Herrmann made use of the theremin. And, in fact, Herrmann used two theremin soloists in the score!

This is a two-part course series dedicated to sampling found sounds at home and turning them into all kinds of beats and tracks in Ableton Live. The first part is taught by Ableton Certified Trainer Brian Jackson, and concerns how to capture sounds using a simple microphone setup at home, and warp them into useable raw materials in Ableton. The second part follows famed YouTuber, beat maker, and educator Andrew Huang as he makes an incredibly compelling song out of nothing but sounds from a kitchen pot — and explains his process step by step on camera.

Flux Bittersweet is a straightforward transient designer that can be used on drums to enhance or dull their attack. To enhance the attack of an instrument, turn the knob towards bitter. To reduce the transients or dull the attack, turn the knob towards the sweet side of the spectrum. This plugin is crucial for getting your drums to sound clear in your mix, whether they’re programmed samples or live recorded drums.

As a general rule, I think comparing your work to other artists can be a pretty unhealthy practice, especially if you have a competitive mentality. But when it comes to duplicating marketing activities and online strategies, learning from them and their tests mean that you aren’t always starting from scratch.